Half of Irish male suicide victims work in construction


A new study has found that over 50 per cent of males who commit suicide in Ireland work in the construction industry.

The Construction Industry Federation (CIF) highlighted the figures as part of their Mind Our Workers campaign, and reported that out of a total of 2,137 male suicides over a four year period, 1,039 of them were from a construction or production background.

The figures relate to suicides between 2008 and 2012.

The CIF launched Mind our Workers, a campaign to raise awareness of suicide and mental health in the sector, was yesterday alongside suicide prevention charity Pieta House.

The report also showed that there are ten suicides in Ireland every week, with eight of these relating to men.

They also showed that:

  • 6,520 suicides took place in Ireland between 2000 and 2012;
  • 5,263 of those suicides were by men (81%);
  • 2,137 male suicides took place in Ireland between 2008 and 2012; and
  • Of the 116,700 people working in the construction sector, 108,300 are men (93% of the overall total).

Pieta House CEO Brian Higgins said, “It is extremely encouraging that a national body as influential as the CIF sees the impact of suicide on the construction industry and its employees and is partnering with an organisation such as ourselves to help tackle the issue. Partnerships such as this are a way of building resilience within our society”.

The ‘Mind Our Workers’ campaign will run throughout the year, as Pieta House representatives lend their support in briefings and workshops as campign leaflets are distributed to CIF members.

“As the statistics highlight, the level of suicide in the construction sector is shocking,” said Tom Parlon, CIF Director General.

“The industry can’t ignore this problem – there is a necessity to take steps to try to help those in need. Given the amount of time people spend in the workplace, that is where the Mind Our Workers campaign will focus.

“By promoting a more open approach amongst construction workers and their colleagues we hope it might reduce the number of people who feel they have no way out.”

The full report can be viewed here.



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