Growing up in Ireland

Growing up in Ireland – New Findings from National Study of 11,000 children

GROWING UP IN IRELAND TO PUBLISH NEW FINDINGS FROM NATIONAL STUDY OF 11,100 FIVE-YEAR-OLDS AND THEIR FAMILIES. Pictured at the Launch of Non-Parental Childcare and Child Cognitive Outcomes at Age Five. were: Ava Gao (Age 7), Minister’s Address and Official Launch of Report: Dr James Reilly T.D., Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Holly Coyle (Age 3), Callum Coyle (Age 6), and Millie Palmer (Age 2). Back row: Professor Alan Barrett (Director), Professor James Williams, Dr Helen Russell and Dr Aisling Murray (ESRI) You are cordially invited to the publication of a new report on the influence of non-parental childcare on the cognitive development of five-year-olds, based on almost 11,000 children and their parents. The findings will be launched by the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Dr James Reilly, T.D. on Thursday 3rd December. Non-Parental Childcare and Child Cognitive Outcomes at Age Five investigates the effects of childcare in early life on children’s cognitive development (i.e. vocabulary and reasoning skills) at age five using a large representative sample of children (circa 9,000) from the Growing Up in Ireland study. At age three, prior to the Free Preschool Year, the main types of non-parental care are relative care (e.g. a grandparent), non-relative care (e.g. a childminder) and centre-based care (e.g. crèche). The report draws on information collected in the first three waves of the Growing Up in Ireland study. The new findings will be launched as part of Growing Up in Ireland’s Annual Research Conference 2015. In addition to the new findings, a total of 22 research papers based on data from the study will be presented by researchers from a wide range of third level and research institutions. The research will focus on a range of topics including health, socio-emotional well-being, education and childcare. (See below for a full list of papers to be presented or log onto http://www.growingup.ie/index.php?id=282 for more details). A press release will be issued on Wednesday 2nd December, 2015. ENDS/ For Further Information Please Contact: Donnacha Ó Súilleabháin, Growing Up in Ireland, ESRI E-Mail: donnacha@esri.ie; Tel: 01 863 2122 Editors Notes The following is a list of papers presented due to be presented at Growing Up in Ireland’s Annual Research Conference 2015.

Pictured at the Launch of Non-Parental Childcare and Child Cognitive Outcomes at Age Five were:

Ava Gao (Age 7), Minister’s Address and Official Launch of Report: Dr James Reilly T.D., Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Holly Coyle (Age 3), Callum Coyle (Age 6), and Millie Palmer (Age 2).

Back row:

Professor Alan Barrett (Director), Professor James Williams, Dr Helen Russell and Dr Aisling Murray (ESRI)

The publication of a new report on the influence of non-parental childcare on the cognitive development of five-year-olds, based on almost 11,000 children and their parents has been released. The findings were launched by the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Dr James Reilly, T.D. on Thursday 3rd December.

Non-Parental Childcare and Child Cognitive Outcomes at Age Five investigates the effects of childcare in early life on children’s cognitive development (i.e. vocabulary and reasoning skills) at age five using a large representative sample of children (circa 9,000) from the Growing Up in Ireland study.

At age three, prior to the Free Preschool Year, the main types of non-parental care are relative care (e.g. a grandparent), non-relative care (e.g. a childminder) and centre-based care (e.g. crèche).

The report draws on information collected in the first three waves of the Growing Up in Ireland study.

The new findings are launched as part of Growing Up in Ireland’s Annual Research Conference 2015. In addition to the new findings, a total of 22 research papers based on data from the study were presented by researchers from a wide range of third level and research institutions.

The research will focus on a range of topics including health, socio-emotional well-being, education and childcare.

Log onto www.growingup.ie for more details.

COMMENTS (0)

Sign in or create your account to join the discussion

Register now to keep updated with the latest Irish news

  • Email updates
  • Competitions and give aways
  • Full access to 28 years of archives

Sign up to our Newsletter to be in with a chance to win a snazzy iPad and for all the latest...

  • Email updates
  • Regular features
  • Competitions and give aways