NEWS — 12 March 2014

By staff reporter

A Trinity College Dublin researcher’s up-close image of a lung cancer cell wins international GE Healthcare Cell Imaging Competition

The image was taken by Donegal Town native Dr Martin Barr, Clinical Scientist and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Institute of Molecular Medicine in Trinity College Dublin and St James’s Hospital, Dublin, who was announced as a winner of an international competition that showcases the beauty of cells and the inspiring research conducted by cellular biologists around the world.

The three winners of GE Healthcare Life Sciences’ 2013 Cell Imaging Competition will see their images displayed on high resolution screens in New York’s Times Square next month.

Dr Barr’s image – taken as part of his ongoing research to better understand and fight resistance to lung cancer treatments – shows in extraordinary detail a lung cancer cell from one of the most common forms of lung cancer; non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

The cell measures just one thousandth of a millimetre, similar in width to a cotton fibre, and is shown in a low-oxygen environment known as ‘hypoxia’. This environment, commonly seen in many solid tumours, makes cancer cells more resistant to chemotherapy and encourages the cancer to spread in the majority of patients. The aim of Dr Barr’s research is to target cellular processes triggered by hypoxia in order to make tumours more susceptible to chemotherapy.

Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality contributing 13% of the total number of new cases diagnosed in 2012. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers.

Speaking about what being a winner of this competition means to him and for cancer awareness, Dr Barr said: “As a winner of the GE Healthcare 2013 Cell Imaging Competition, I am absolutely delighted to have one of my images recognised as a prize-winning image by an expert international panel of judges and a public vote of over 23,000 votes.

“Lung cancer mortality remains significantly high worldwide and in Ireland continues to increase, particularly in women. While novel strategies to target the various cellular processes implicated in resistance to current therapies unfold, a visual image of a cell can have more of an impact and in some instances speak more loudly than words, and highlights the cellular complexity of a cancer cell.”

“To see my winning image displayed on the large high-definition screens in Times Square in New York is a unique, once-in-a-life time opportunity and something I would never have imagined in my career as a cancer research scientist. The projection of my image in this major international hot-spot will hopefully bring further awareness of lung cancer to the general public.”

The image which won the High-Content Analysis category of the competition was taken using an IN Cell Analyzer, one of GE’s high resolution cell imaging and analysis systems. This technology allows researchers to acquire and analyse multiple images of thousands of cells in a short period of time to aid in the development of tailored drug therapies to combat diseases such as cancer.

The winning images and gallery of all the finalists’ entries to the 2013 Cell Imaging Competition are available at www.gelifesciences.com/cellimagecompetition.

Print Friendly

Share

About Author

shelly

(0) Readers Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>